Whole School Plan for Special Needs Provision

 

This Policy for Special Needs Provision in Loreto NS, was initially formulated by  Mary O’Sullivan, Maree Hogan and Olivia Nestor (Learning-Support Resource Teachers), during September 2007.

The Draft Policy was discussed and further developed by the teaching staff of Loreto NS September 2007.It was then adopted as policy in October 2007.

The Policy was discussed, accepted and ratified by the Board of Management of Loreto NS in November 2007.

It would be due for review every two years.




1. Situation

Loreto N.S was allocated three LSR teachers under the General Allocation Model (GAM) in June 2012, another teacher was allocated for Low Incidence and Language.

 


 

2. Aims of Learning-Support

The principal aim of Learning-Support provision ‘is to optimise the teaching and learning process in order to enable pupils with learning difficulties to achieve adequate levels of proficiency in literary and numeracy before leaving primary school’(LSG: p.15). This support may be provided by the class teacher and / or the LSRT (See Appendix 1: The Staged Approach, described in Circular 02/05)

2.1 Subsidiary aims

  • To enable pupils to participate in the full curriculum for their class level
  • To develop positive self esteem and positive attitudes about school and learning in pupils
  • To enable pupils to monitor their own learning and become independent learners
  • To provide supplementary teaching and additional support in English and / or Mathematics
  • To involve parents in supporting their children through effective parent-support programmes
  • To promote collaboration among teacher in the implementation of whole-school policies on learning support for pupils
  • To establish early intervention programmes designed to enhance learning and to prevent / reduce difficulties in learning
  • To guard the self-esteem and self-image of the learner.

 


 

3. Principles

Effective learning programmes are based on the following principles:

  • Effective whole-school policies and parental involvement
  • Prevention of failure
  • Provision of intensive early intervention
  • Direction of resources towards pupils in greatest need.

 


 

4. Staff Roles and Responsibilities

The role of supporting learning is a collaborative responsibility shared by all:- The Board of Management, Principal Teacher, Class Teachers, Learning-Support Teacher, Resource Teacher, Parents and Children. It is important that everyone contributes in the planning and implementation of our school plan on Learning-Support Provision.

4.1 Role of the Board of Management

The Board ofManagement should:

  • Oversee the development, implementation and review of the Learning-Support policy.
  • Ensure that adequate classroom accommodation and teaching resources are provided for the learning-support teacher.
  • Provide adequate funds for the purchase of Learning-Support materials. “Funds provided for these materials should not be limited to the learning-support grant provided by the Department of Education and Science”, (Learning-Support Guidelines, p. 47).
  • Provide a secure facility for storage of records relating to pupils in receipt of learning-support services.

4.2 Role of Principal

“The principal teacher has overall responsibility for the school’s learning-support programme and for the operation of services for children with special educational needs”. (Learning-Support Guidelines, p.38).

The Principal Teacher should:

  • Assume overall responsibility for the development and implementation of the school’s policies on learning-support and special needs in co-operation with the Learning-Support Teacher and the other six schools in our cluster.
  • Work with teachers and parents in the development of the school plan on learning-support and special needs.
  • Monitor the implementation of the school plan on learning-support and special needs on an ongoing basis.
  • Organise at least one, but preferably two, cluster meetings.
  • Monitor the selection of pupils for supplementary teaching, ensuring that this service is focused on the pupils with very low achievement.
  • Oversee the implementation of a whole-school assessment and screening programme to identify pupils with very low achievement and learning difficulties so that these pupils can be provided with the support they need.
  • Keep teachers informed about the external assessment services that are available and the procedures to be followed for initial referrals.
  • Help teachers increase their knowledge and skills in the area of learning-support.
  • Liase regularly with the Learning-Support Teacher. “In order to support the implementation of school policy on learning support as outlined in the school plan, the principal teacher should arrange a meeting with the learning-support teacher at least once each school term to discuss the implementation of the school plan on learning support” (Learning-Support Guidelines, p. 40).
  • Assume direct responsibility for co-ordinating learning-support and special needs services. The role of co-ordinating learning-support and special needs services may be filled by the principal teacher him / herself. Alternatively the principal teacher may assign these duties to another teacher such as a special education teacher, learning-support teacher or post holder.

Typically, the duties assigned to this role would include the following:

  • Maintaining a list of pupils who are receiving supplementary teaching and / or special educational services
  • Help to co-ordinate the caseloads / work schedules of the learning-support and resource teachers
  • Supporting the implementation of a tracking system at whole-school level to monitor the progress of children with learning difficulties
  • Advise parents on procedures for availing of special needs services
  • Liaising with external agencies such as psychological services to arrange assessments and special provision for pupils with special needs
  • Arrange for classroom accommodation and resources, as appropriate.

4.3 Role of Class Teacher

  • Circular 02/05 demands the implementation of the Staged Approach. Stage 1 of this approach requires class teachers to support their pupil’s learning, in the first instance (See Appendix 1 of this policy)
  • The Staged Approach requires class teachers to construct simple, individual plans of support and to implement this plan for a specified time before referring the child for Stage 2 interventions (See Appendix 1 of this policy)
  • Circular 02/05 demands that ‘Interventions with pupils at Stage 2 and 3 should include a classroom support plan to ensure that pupil’s needs are met for the whole school day’ (p.7)
  • The Learning Support Guidelines (2000) advocate a significant change in the role of the class teacher, in terms of increasing emphasis on consultation with the learning-support teacher and with parents.
  • The class teacher has primary responsibility for the progress of all pupils in her / his class, including those selected for supplementary teaching.
  • “A particular responsibility of the class teacher is to create a classroom environment in which learning difficulties can be prevented or at least alleviated”, (Learning-Support Guidelines, p. 42).

This can be achieved by:

    • Grouping pupils for instruction
    • Providing lower-achieving pupils with strategies for reading, spelling and problem solving
    • Adapting learning materials for lower-achieving pupils
    • Liaising closely with their parents.
  • When supplementary teaching cannot be provided for a pupil, or is being phased out or discontinued, the class teacher will need to develop and implement a support programme that meets the pupil’s changing needs, in consultation with the learning-support teacher.
  • In supporting the development and implementation of the school plan on learning support the class teacher should administer and score appropriate screening measures, and discuss the outcomes with the Learning-Support Teacher. CHANGE WORDING?????
  • The class teacher plays an important role in the initial identification of pupils who may have general or specific learning disabilities. The class teacher refer the pupil to the learning-support teacher for appropriate screening.
  • For each pupil who is in receipt of supplementary teaching, the class teacher will collaborate with the learning-support teacher in the development of an Individual Profile and Learning Programme by identifying appropriate learning targets and by organising classroom activities to achieve those targets.
  • For each pupil who is in receipt of supplementary teaching, the class teacher will adjust the class programme in line with the agreed learning targets and activities on the pupil’s Individual Profile and Learning Programme and maintain an appropriate record of the pupil’s progress towards achieving those learning targets.
  • With regard to teaching pupils with low achievement, the following general approaches and methods are recommended:
    • Group teaching
    • Modifying presentation and questioning techniques to maximise the involvement of pupils with low achievement in class activities
    • Placing an emphasis on oral language development across the curriculum
    • Providing pupils with extra tutoring in the key basic skills in literacy and numeracy
    • Setting learning targets at an appropriate level
    • Providing learning activities and materials which are suitably challenging but which also ensure success and progress
    • Carrying out error analyses of a pupil’s work to pinpoint specific areas of difficulty, for particular attention in subsequent lessons
    • Setting up ‘buddy systems’ in class (high achievers collaboratively working with low achievers).
  • A key role of successful learning-support is a very high level of consultation and co-operation between the class teacher and the learning-support teacher.Central to this consultation is the development, implementation and review of Individual Profile and Learning Programmes. This consultation will be achieved through formal time-tabling at least once per month, and through informal consultation as the need arises.
  • It is accepted practice for class teachers to consult with the parents of all their pupils from time to time. However, for parents of pupils who are in receipt of supplementary teaching, additional time should be devoted to consultation and collaborative planning. In the case of each pupil who has been identified as experiencing low achievement and / or a learning difficulty following administration of an appropriate screening measure, the class teacher should:
    • Make parents aware of the concerns of the school about their child’s progress
    • Outline the school’s practices regarding the administration of diagnostic tests by the learning-support teacher and seek the approval of the pupil’s parents to proceed with such assessment
    • Outline the support that is available in the school to pupils who experience low achievement and / or learning difficulties in consultation with the LSRT.
    • Indicate to the pupil’s parents that a meeting with the learning-support teacher will follow the assessment
    • After the diagnostic assessment, attend, if possible, the meeting between the pupil’s parents and the learning-support teacher and indicate how the pupil’s class programme will be modified in order to achieve the agreed learning targets in the pupil’s Individual Profile and Learning Plan.

4.4 Role of Learning-Support Teacher

The activities of the learning support teacher should include both teaching and non-teaching duties. According to the Learning-Support Guidelines (2000) “The particular balance that the learning-support teacher achieves between supplementary teaching and consultative activities will depend on the specific circumstances of the school” (p. 32).The learning-support teacher’s activities should include, where possible:

  • Assisting in the implementation of a broad range of whole-school strategies designed to enhance early learning and to prevent learning difficulties.
  • Provide supplementary teaching commensurate with the child’s particular and individual needs.
  • Research the pupil’s specific learning difficulty, to become au fait with this impediment to learning.
  • Implement recommendations from outside agencies, wherever possible, and liaise with outside agencies pertinent to the children in their care.
  • Development of an Individual Profile and Learning Programme for each pupil who is selected for supplementary teaching, in consultation with class teachers and parents.
  • Maintaining a weekly planning and progress record, or equivalent, for each individual or group of pupils in receipt of learning support.
  • Delivering early intervention programmes and providing supplementary teaching in English and / or Mathematics to pupils in the junior section of the school (Junior Infants to 2nd Class), caseload permitting
  • Co-ordinating the implementation of whole-school procedures for the selection of pupils for supplementary teaching, giving due consideration to:
    • The selection criteria specified in this Learning-Support Policy
    • Teachers’ professional observations
    • Input from parents
    • Input from pupils (EPSEN 2006)
  • Contributing to the development of policy on Learning-Support at the whole school level.
  • Providing advice to the Class Teacher (if requested) about pupils who are experiencing learning difficulties in such areas as:
    • Individual pupil assessment
    • Programme planning
    • Curriculum differentiation
    • Approaches to language development
    • Approaches to reading
    • Approaches to spelling
    • Approaches to writing
    • Approaches to Mathematics
  • Meet with parents of each pupil who is in receipt of LSR to discuss targets and ways in which attainment of the targets can be supported at home.
  • Meet with parents of each pupil who is receipt of LSR at theend of each instructional term:
    • To review the pupil’s attainment of agreed targets
    • To discuss the next instructional term
    • To revise the pupil’s IPLP
  • Contributing at the school level to decision making regarding the purchase of learning resources, books and materials to be made available to pupils with learning difficulties in their mainstream classrooms and in the learning-support teacher’s room.
  • Performing a defined role in co-ordinating the provision of special needs and learning-support services in the school, as requested and time permitting.
  • Liaising with external agencies such as educational psychologists, speech and language therapists etc… to arrange assessments and special provision for pupils with special needs.
  • Collaborate with the principal teacher and meet with her at least once each school term to discuss issues relating to the development and implementation of the school plan on learning-support, and to the provision of Learning-Support.
  • The learning-support teacher should work closely with class teachers to implement school policies on preventing learning difficulties, screening pupils for learning difficulties, interpreting the outcomes of diagnostic assessments and providing supplementary teaching and other forms of learning-support, where it is deemed necessary.
  • The learning-support teacher plays an important role in co-ordinating the selection of pupils for supplementary teaching. The learning-support teacher should:
    • Co-ordinate the administration by class teachers of a whole-school screening programme to identify pupils with very low achievement and / or learning difficulties in English and Mathematics
    • Consult with class teachers on the identification of pupils who may need diagnostic assessment, taking into account the pupils’ scores on an appropriate standardised screening measure.
    • Carry out a comprehensive diagnostic assessment of each pupil who has been identified as experiencing low achievement and / or learning difficulties and, in consultation with the class teacher and parents, identify the type and level of learning-support that is needed to meet the pupil’s needs.
  • In addition to providing supplementary teaching to pupils, the learning-support teacher is involved in administering a range of formal and informal assessments and in maintaining records of the outcomes of those assessments. The learning-support teacher should:
    • Conduct an initial diagnostic assessment of each pupil who has been identified as having low achievement and / or a learning difficulty, based on results of an appropriate screening measure and record the findings of the assessment in the pupil’s Individual Profile and Learning Programme.
    • Monitor the on-going progress of each pupil in receipt of supplementary teaching in relation to the attainment of agreed learning targets and short-term objectives that arise from them, and record the observations in the Weekly Planning and Progress Record, or equivalent.
    • Review the progress of each pupil at the end of an instructional term and record it on the pupil’s Individual Profile and Learning Programme.

4.5.Role of Parents

“Parents through their unique knowledge of their own child, have much to contribute to their child’s learning programmes” (Learning-Support Guidelines, p.52). Parents can prepare for and support the work of the school by:

  • Providing a home environment in which there are opportunities for adults and children to participate together in language, literacy and mathematical activities in the early years before formal schooling begins.
  • Supporting the work of the school by participating with their child in such activities as:
    • Using Information and Communications Technology (ICTs), where available, to support learning in English and / or Mathematics
    • Book sharing / reading stories
    • Storytelling
    • Paired reading (listening to and giving supportive feedback on oral reading)
    • Discussions about school and other activities to build vocabulary and thinking skills
    • Writing lists and short accounts about children’s experiences
    • Counting and measuring and other activities involving number
    • Visits to the zoo, museum, library etc… to broaden the range of their child’s experiences
    • Where their child is in receipt of supplementary teaching, implementing suggested home-based activities outlined in their child’s Individual Profile and Learning Programme and discussing the outcomes with the child’s teachers.
  • Talking positively about school and school work;
  • Availing of real-life situations to discuss the importance of language, literacy and mathematics.
  • Modelling involvement in language, literacy and mathematical activities at home by engaging in and talking about these activities.
  • Where their child is in receipt of supplementary teaching, implementing suggested home-based activities outlined in their child’s Individual Profile and Learning Programme and discussing the outcomes with the child’s teachers.
  • Parents should keep the class teacher informed of the progress that they observe in their child’s learning. They should also let the school know of any learning difficulties that they observe in their child at home. If, following diagnostic assessment, the child has been identified as requiring supplementary teaching, the parents should attend a meeting with the learning-support teacher to discuss:
    • The results of the assessment
    • The learning targets in the child’s Individual Profile and Learning programme
    • The actions to be taken by the school to meet those targets
    • The ways in which attainment of the targets can be supported at home.
  • Where a child is in receipt of supplementary teaching from the learning-support teacher, the parents should:
    • Discuss their child’s progress with the learning-support teacher at the end of each instructional term, and, in cases where supplementary teaching is to be continued, discuss the revised learning targets and activities in their child’s Individual Profile and Learning Programme
    • At the discontinuation of supplementary teaching, discuss with their child’s teachers how the child’s future learning needs can continue to be met at school and at home
    • Participate in activities organised by the school that are designed to increase the involvement of parents in their children’s learning
    • Become familiar with and contribute to the development of the school plan on learning support individually and through involvement in parents’ associations.

4.6 Role of Pupils

Pupils who are in receipt of supplementary teaching should, as appropriate:

  • Become familiar with the medium and short-term learning targets that have been set for them and they should be given the opportunity to contribute to the setting of such targets.(EPSEN 2006)
  • Contribute to the selection of texts and other learning materials that are relevant to the attainment of their learning targets.
  • Develop ‘ownership’ of the skills and strategies that are taught during supplementary teaching and learn to apply these learning strategies and skills to improve their own learning.
  • Contribute to the evaluation of their progress by participating in appropriate assessment activities.

 


 

5. Internal Provision

“The involvement of pupils in the development, implementation and review of their own learning programmes is an important principle underlining effective supplementary teaching” (Learning-Support Guidelines, p.54).

5.1 Preventionand Early Intervention

Prevention/Early intervention is a cornerstone of Learning Support.

Our strategies for preventing learning difficulties include:

  • The development of agreed approaches to the teaching of English and Mathematics in order to ensure progression and continuity from class to class. (See Plean Scoile for English and Mathematics)
  • Provision of additional support in language development and relevant early literacy skills to pupils who need it
  • Implementation of paired reading programmes involving adults/parents and pupils in the school
  • On-going structured observation and assessment of the language, literacy and numeracy skills of pupils in the infant classes to facilitate early identification of possible learning difficulties
  • Close collaboration and consultation between the Infant teacher and the Learning-support teacher.

5.2 Early Intervention Programmes

  • Early intervention is a vital component of the learning-support provision in this school, caseload permitting. Early intervention programmes may be provided by the class teacher and / or by the learning-support teacher, in accordance with the Staged Approach, as outlined in Circular 02/05 (p.21-22) and as available here in Appendix 1.
  • Close collaboration and consultation between the class teachers and the learning-support teacher, will identify pupils who may be in need of early intervention. Teacher observation and professional opinion will be given due consideration and respect in the selection of pupils for early intervention programmes.
  • Intensive early intervention programmes in the early primary classes can be an effective response to meeting the needs of children with low achievement. These programmes will:
    • Be set within a specific time frame (13-20 weeks) LS Term 1/2
    • Be based on a shared expectation of success by everyone involved
    • Involve small group teaching or one-to-one teaching where small group teaching has not been effective
    • Include a strong focus on oral language, laying the foundation for meaningful reading activities and further development of language and comprehension skills
    • Emphasise the development of phonemic awareness and a range of other word identification skills
    • Stress the interconnected nature of listening, speaking, reading and writing
    • Focus on language development in mathematics, and in the development of mathematical procedures and concepts.

 


 

6. Policy on Screening, Assessment, Caseload, Selection, Permissions and Review

This section of the policy refers to policy etc. in Loreto N.S.

6.1 Parental Permissions

  1. Written parental permissions are required for children to attend learning support??? Address this
  2. Written parental permissions are also required for the LSRT to undertake individual diagnostic testing (Circular 02/05)
 

6.2 Initial Screening

Learning Support teachers will carry out the initial screening tests. LSRTteachers will also correct and record results for B.I.A.P, Quest, Micra-T and DPMT standardised tests.

 

6.3 Diagnostic Assessment

The learning-support teacher will discuss each school’s recorded results with the staff of that school and carry out further screening tests and / or diagnostic assessments where it is deemed necessary.

 

6.4 Caseload Decisions

Large caseloads have led to a dilution of LSR provision and this is to be avoided as is the inclusion of average -achieving pupils on the LSRT caseload. The Staged Approach (See Appendix 1 of this policy) ,together with current guidelines (the LSG), and DES directives must inform all decision making regarding the LSRT’s caseload.

 

6.5 Selection Criteria

The selection criteria encompass all current guidelines and general good practice. The LSRT will select pupils in accordance with these criteria, stopping at (1) if his/her caseload is full, but will continue on to point (2) caseload permitting and so on through the selection criteria

  1. Pupils diagnosed as having Low Incidence Learning disabilities e.g. Down’s Syndrome, ADD etc.
  2. Pupils diagnosed as having High Incidence learning disabilities e.g. dyslexia
  3. Pupils scoring at/below the 10th percentile on standardised assessments in literacy
  4. Pupils scoring at or below the 12th percentile on standardised assessments in literacy (to allow for margin of error)
  5. Early intervention in literacy (Infants -2nd class pupils who continue to experience difficulty, despite Stage One interventions by the class teacher)
  6. Pupils scoring at or below the 10th percentile on standardised assessments in mathematics
  7. Pupils scoring at or below the 12th percentile on standardised assessments in mathematics
  8. Early intervention in mathematics (Infants-2nd class pupils who continue to experience difficulty, despite Stage One interventions by the class teacher)
  9. Pupils scoring above the 12th percentile on standardised assessments in literacy who continue to experience difficulty, despite Stage One interventions by the class teacher, under the Staged Approach
  10. Pupils scoring above the 12th percentile on standardised assessments in mathematics, who continue to experience difficulty, despite Stage One interventions by the class teacher, under the Staged Approach
  11. Pupils scoring above the 30th percentile in standardised tests in maths/literacy who continue to experience difficulty may be included in the caseload at the discretion of the principal.
 

6.6 Deploying Resources: The 6 Steps from Circular 02/05

(1) Step 1 Circular 02/05, p.7
A list of every pupil in the school, who has been highlighted as being in need of support, will be compiled by the Learning Support and Resource teachers.

(2) Step Circular 02/05, p.7
This list will be examined in consultation with Circular 02/05, and each child will be allocated support, as appropriate under the terms of the staged approach

(3) Step 3 Circular 02/05, p.7
A list of member of the teaching staff will be compiled by Sr. Maria

(4) Step 4 Circular 02/05, p.8
A member of staff will be allocated to support the learning of each pupil identified, taking into account: the Staged Approach; the needs of the pupils; the expertise and experience of the teacher; and practical considerations

(5) Step 5 Circular 02/05, p.8
Pupils with similar needs may be grouped for support

(6) Step 6 Circular 02/05, p.8
A tracking and recording system will be established by the Learning Support and Resource Team. Teachers will actively monitor the progress of pupils.

 

6.7 Staff Meetings

Learning Support will be included on the agenda for staff meetings at least once per instructional term

 

6.8 Parent -Teacher Meetings

The nature of LSRT means that meetings with parents are on-going and regular.

 


 

7. Continuing and Discontinuing Supplementary Teaching

  • A meeting will be held at the end of each instructional term with the parents in cases where supplementary teaching is to be continued to discuss the revised learning targets and activities in the pupil’s Individual Profile and Learning Programme.
  • Supplementary teaching will normally be discontinued where the targets have been met and the pupil (on assessment) is performing above the percentile laid down in the criteria for receiving learning-support.

 


 

8. Monitoring Progress

Monitoring the academic progress of the pupils in this school will be accomplished by:

  • On-going assessment of the language, literacy and numeracy skills of the pupils in the infant classes to facilitate early identification of possible learning difficulties by the class teacher.
  • Formal and informal testing and observation of work by the class teacher.????
  • Implementing the school policies on screening and the selection of pupils for supplementary teaching in English and / or in Mathematics by administering and scoring appropriate measures:
    • For Senior Infant pupils: Micra-T each year in May
    • For 1st to 6th Class pupils: Micra-T in May andDPMT each year in October
  • Standardised and diagnostic testing by the learning-support teacher.
  • Record keeping (Children have a file where records, test results and assessments are kept in a secure filing cabinet).
  • Non-academic progress of pupils in this school will be reviewed informally, for example under the headings of improvements in the pupil’s self esteem; school attendance; attitude to learning; attitude to school and general behaviour.

 


 

9. Liaising with Parents

Effective communication with parents is critically important to the success of a learning-support programme

 

9.1 Communication with Parents

  • Teachers will take every opportunity to make parents familiar with the purpose and procedures of the school’s learning-support team.
  • Activities may be organised in our school, from time to time, to increase the involvement of parents in their children’s learning.Parents will be encouraged to support their child’s learning through:
    • Developing children’s oral language through discussion
    • Motivating children to read more
    • Creating a home environment where literacy can thrive
    • Selecting books that interest children
    • Counting, measuring and other activities involving number.

 

9.2 Principal Teacher Liasing with Parents

While the learning-support teacher will consult with parents and outside agencies on an on-going basis, the principal teacher can facilitate the involvement of parents in the learning-support process by:

  • Establishing school policies and procedures, which enable parents to become involved effectively in the provision of learning-support.
  • Encouraging the organisation of information sessions for all parents on issues relating to the school’s learning-support service.
  • Overseeing the development of links between teachers and the providers of assessments and other services.

 

9.3 Class Teacher Liaising with Parents

  • Once a pupil has come to the attention of the school because of low achievement it will be possible for the class teacher in the context of ongoing contact with the parents to make them aware of the situation and to ascertain the parent’s views about the child’s performance at school.
  • Seek the parent’s approval to proceed with diagnostic assessment, which may lead to supplementary teaching. Permission for diagnostic testing by the learning-support teacher must be given by parents in writing. When a child is selected for learning-support the parents must accept or decline the place in writing (Draft letter for this purpose, Appendix 2).
  • Indicate that a meeting with the learning-support teacher and the parents will take place following diagnostic assessment and prior to the commencement of supplementary teaching.
  • Seek the parent’s permission for their child to attend supplementary teaching with the learning-support teacher (Draft letter for this purpose, Appendix 1).

 

9.4 The Learning-Support Teacher Liaising with Parents

In addition to providing general information to parents about the learning-support services that are available in the school, the learning-support teacher should:

  • After the initial diagnostic assessment has been completed, meet with each pupil’s parents to discuss the outcomes of the assessment.
  • Discuss the learning targets in the child’s Individual Profile and Learning Programme with the parents, the actions to be taken by the school to meet those targets and the ways in which attainment of the targets can be supported at home (if it is decided that supplementary teaching will be provided by the learning-support teacher).
  • Communicate on an on-going basis with the parents of each pupil who is in receipt of supplementary teaching so that progress can be positively affirmed and any difficulties in implementing the pupil’s learning programme at school or at home can either be anticipated and avoided or addressed without delay.
  • Consult with the parents of each pupil who is in receipt of supplementary teaching at the end of the instructional term to review the pupil’s attainment of agreed learning targets, to discuss the level of supplementary teaching (if any) that will be provided in the next instructional term and to revise the pupil’s Individual Profile and Learning Programme as necessary.
  • Consult with parents when supplementary teaching is to be discontinued and identify ways in which the pupil’s learning can continue to be supported at school and at home
  • Demonstrate techniques and strategies to parents that will enable them to help with their child’s development in such areas as oral language, reading, writing, spelling and mathematics
  • Where relevant, collaborate with other teachers to advise parents on ways in which they can support their children’s learning at home.

 


 

10. Monitoring and Reviewing of Policy

Monitoring of the Learning-Support Policy is an on-going and developmental process. The whole school staff of this school will discuss the Learning-Support Policy at least once per year at a staff meeting and review as necessary

  


 

Bibliography

Department of Education and Science (1999) Primary School Curriculum. Your child’s learning. Guidelines for parents, Dublin: Stationery Office.

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Government of Ireland, Department of Education and Science (2001a) Report of the Task Force on Autism, Dublin: Stationery Office.

Government of Ireland, Department of Education and Science (2001b) Report of the Task Force on Dyslexia, Dublin: Stationery Office. 

Government of Ireland, Department of Education and Science (2000) Learning-Support Guidelines, Dublin: Stationery Office.

Government of Ireland & National Council for Curriculum Assessment (1999a) Primary School Curriculum, Introduction, Dublin: Stationery Office. 

Government of Ireland & National Council for Curriculum Assessment (1999b) Primary School Curriculum. English Language. Teacher Guidelines, Dublin: Stationery Office.

Government of Ireland & National Council for Curriculum Assessment (1999c) Primary School Curriculum. English Language, Dublin: Stationery Office.

Government of Ireland & National Council for Curriculum Assessment(1999d) Primary School Curriculum. Mathematics, Dublin: Stationery Office.

Government of Ireland & National Council for Curriculum Assessment (1999e) Primary School Curriculum. Mathematics. Teacher Guidelines, Dublin: Stationery Office.

Government of Ireland, Department of Education and Science (1993) Report of the Special Education Review Committee (SERC), Dublin: Stationery Office.

Irish National Teachers Organization (2001) Literacy in the Primary School, Dublin: I.N.T.O. Publication.

Irish National Teachers Organization (1997) Teaching and Learning: Issues in Assessment, Dublin: I.N.T.O. Publication.

Irish National Teachers Organization (1994) Remedial Education. A Review, Dublin: I.N.T.O. Publication.